List of questions

A
Adduct Analys ABWorkshop language: English
  • 2148

    Pharmacokinetic studies are part of early drug development in Oncology, but after that less attention is given to drug exposure. - How can a more individualized determination of dosing and exposure be used in oncology? (Would this be of interest in animal studies or only in patient studies?) - To what extent does logistics (taking and analyzing blood samples for pharmacokinetic studies) affect development plans for new clinical studies? What barriers would need to be breached to positively affect study design? - Could more cost-effective pharmacokinetic studies benefit patients and improve a new drug’s chances of success?


    Adduct analysis offers a unique method for therapeutic drug monitoring that allows us to measure the active blood levels of substances previously difficult to assess. This can be used to personalize dose, avoid toxicity, increase treatment efficiency and monitor compliance. We are currently working to develop a specialized and much simplified method for measuring individualized exposure to cytostatics. Many dose regimes are routinely based on the patient's body surface area, body weight or at the same dose regardless of these factors. Pharmacokinetic studies are performed early in drug development, after which the difference in exposure is rarely measured. The benefit is based on the patient group's best, not the individuals. To what extent do you judge that this impedes the potential of the drugs that develop, for example, in your research. If the sampling/logistics procedure routinely used could be simplified, the cost/sample will drop. How would this affect the scientific issues in your studies? Would this, for example, be of value to do more comprehensive surveys in the later stages of drug development?


Amgen ABWorkshop language: English
  • 2141

    Resilience - Could the usage of a web based application for reporting patients’ emotional state, tailored educational content and communication with HCPs in patients with blood cancer change the overall outcome in terms of psychosocial wellbeing?


    Each phase of the cancer experience profoundly affects patients’ lives. Much has focused on negative consequences of cancer; however, the study of resilience may enable providers to promote more positive psychosocial outcomes before, during, and after the cancer experience. Some have suggested that resilience is defined by baseline characteristics or traits, which are identified at the time of first interactions and enable individuals to thrive in the face of adversity. Others have described resilience as a particular trajectory or mechanism of positive adaptation that changes over time and protects against psychological distress. Interventions devoted to promoting resilience have been developed. Patients are thus impacted by mental health and psychosocial disorders, in addition to physical symptoms and treatment side effects. At Amgen we are interested in patient resilience and psychological health related to cancer diagnosis, treatment and in follow up cancer care. Treatment and disease related issues can substantially influence the psychosocial status in patients with cancer. With new treatments and improved outcomes life expectancy of cancer patients increases every year. If a patients resilience towards all the negative effects of a cancer diagnosis can be increased this can substantially change the entire life of the patient. In theory and in a research setting, web based applications have proven to help patients to cope with emotional issues associated with cancer. We are currently interested in evaluating a customized resilience web application for reporting patients’ emotional state, tailored educational content and communication with HCPs. Our aim is to transfer such an application into a real world setting.

    AIMday Cancer Uppsala Oct 2018.docx


Atlas AntibodiesWorkshop language: English
  • 2127

    Which specific areas within specialized oncological diagnostics/tumor pathology require particular attention from us as antibody manufacturers when it comes to development of antibody-based diagnostic tools/antibody biomarkers?


    This question is pertinent to semiquantitive/quantitative IHC (including immunooncological parameters) and as well as of quantitative analyses of liquid biopsies, the tumour secretome(s), and circulating tumour cells. We would certainly imagine neuroendocrine tumours, subclasses of lung carcinomas and rare or underinvestigated tumor conditions as relevant disease niches to explore. Atlas Antibodies aims to provide customers with advanced research reagents targeting all human proteins. The company was founded by researchers from the Human Protein Atlas (HPA)- project, who wanted to make the unique antibodies used in the project available to fellow researchers worldwide. In close partnership with the HPA project, we continue to develop advanced antibodies and advanced reagents for Mass Spectrometry (MS)-based quantitative proteomics. Of the possible 20,000 protein coding genes in the human body we already have over 21,000 antibodies covering 15,000 gene products and an additional 20,000 protein quantification MS-standards representing 13,000 protein targets.. The HPA project is a unique world leading effort to create a complete immunohistochemistry based map of human protein expression and localization in normal tissues, cancers and cell lines.

  • 2128

    What are the current and future needs for the development of novel CDx markers for biologics in oncology and how can we assist in that process?


    Atlas Antibodies aims to provide customers with advanced research reagents targeting all human proteins. The company was founded by researchers from the Human Protein Atlas (HPA)- project, who wanted to make the unique antibodies used in the project available to fellow researchers worldwide. In close partnership with the HPA project, we continue to develop advanced antibodies and advanced reagents for Mass Spectrometry (MS)-based quantitative proteomics. Of the possible 20,000 protein coding genes in the human body we already have over 21,000 antibodies covering 15,000 gene products and an additional 20,000 protein quantification MS-standards representing 13,000 protein targets.. The HPA project is a unique world leading effort to create a complete immunohistochemistry based map of human protein expression and localization in normal tissues, cancers and cell lines.


B
Bristol-Myers Squibb ABWorkshop language: English
  • 2200

    2140: How can we collaborate in Real World Evidence to meet the needs of Payers, Regulators, Healthcare? 2139: How can we improve utilization of Real World Data (RWD) and generation of Real World Evidence (RWE) for a faster implementation of clinical benefits for patients?


    2140: There is ever growing interest in Real World Evidence and particularly in the field of oncology and immunotherapy, were new therapies entering the market, and increasing pressure on healthcare to adopt these innovations quickly within their limited budgets with the objective of improving of quality of care. There are increasing requirements to document safety and effectiveness of new therapies and the regulatory authorities are increasingly interested in how these new products are used in clinical practice. Payors want to understand the cost-effectiveness of these treatments and patient outcomes, but there are difficulties with follow up of the use of these treatments. Patients´ access to innovative therapies are dependent upon the ability to answer the questions that payers and regulators have. So, the question that arises is: How can we efficiently collaborate with the patient in focus to meet all the demands and needs of the different stakeholders? 2139: Sweden has unique possibilities to generate high value real world data through our quality registries. However, extraction of data is slow and complicated, and the coverage of relevant information varies in different oncology registries. 1. How can generation of RWD be improved (coverage and relevant parameters)? 2. How can data become more accessible? 3. How can obtained data be implemented as a basis for improving patient care?

  • 2201

    2138: How can new biomarkers be implemented more rapidly in clinical practice? What is needed in terms of set up of testing and analysis abilities and inclusion in registries in order to track test implementation and outcomes?’ 2142: How can the implementation of next generation sequencing in healthcare be facilitated for the benefit of patients and society?


    2138: With the fast emergence of precision medicine and new biomarkers in oncology and the history of slow implementation of testing for new biomarkers, it is crucial to better structure the implementation processes on a national and local level. How can the knowledge needed be ensured for implementation in clinical practice and how can set up of testing and analysis abilities be obtained? To be able to follow patient benefits of biomarkers, inclusion in registries upfront is important, to track testing frequency implementation, but more importantly outcomes in both a tested and non-tested population. 2142: We are in a "genetic revolution" where things that were not possible to do a few years ago soon will be standard procedure. How can we make sure the society and patients benefit the most of new technology?


C
ContextVision Workshop language: English
  • 2170

    How can we ensure that AI projects get access to correct training material form clinical data records without breaching current and future ethical considerations? How can we incorporate peer review published scientific and clinical data into our AI algorithms?


    na


I
Illumina ABWorkshop language: English
  • 2143

    How can broad molecular testing such as whole genome sequencing, whole exome sequencing and large gene panels with 500 genes and above be implemented as a standard test for cancer patients and what are the barriers/challenges that needs to be considered?


    We are in a "genetic revolution" where things that were not possible to do a few years ago soon will be standard procedure. How can we make sure the society and patients benefit the most of new technology?

  • 2201

    2138: How can new biomarkers be implemented more rapidly in clinical practice? What is needed in terms of set up of testing and analysis abilities and inclusion in registries in order to track test implementation and outcomes?’ 2142: How can the implementation of next generation sequencing in healthcare be facilitated for the benefit of patients and society?


    2138: With the fast emergence of precision medicine and new biomarkers in oncology and the history of slow implementation of testing for new biomarkers, it is crucial to better structure the implementation processes on a national and local level. How can the knowledge needed be ensured for implementation in clinical practice and how can set up of testing and analysis abilities be obtained? To be able to follow patient benefits of biomarkers, inclusion in registries upfront is important, to track testing frequency implementation, but more importantly outcomes in both a tested and non-tested population. 2142: We are in a "genetic revolution" where things that were not possible to do a few years ago soon will be standard procedure. How can we make sure the society and patients benefit the most of new technology?


IQVIAWorkshop language: English
  • 2200

    2140: How can we collaborate in Real World Evidence to meet the needs of Payers, Regulators, Healthcare? 2139: How can we improve utilization of Real World Data (RWD) and generation of Real World Evidence (RWE) for a faster implementation of clinical benefits for patients?


    2140: There is ever growing interest in Real World Evidence and particularly in the field of oncology and immunotherapy, were new therapies entering the market, and increasing pressure on healthcare to adopt these innovations quickly within their limited budgets with the objective of improving of quality of care. There are increasing requirements to document safety and effectiveness of new therapies and the regulatory authorities are increasingly interested in how these new products are used in clinical practice. Payors want to understand the cost-effectiveness of these treatments and patient outcomes, but there are difficulties with follow up of the use of these treatments. Patients´ access to innovative therapies are dependent upon the ability to answer the questions that payers and regulators have. So, the question that arises is: How can we efficiently collaborate with the patient in focus to meet all the demands and needs of the different stakeholders? 2139: Sweden has unique possibilities to generate high value real world data through our quality registries. However, extraction of data is slow and complicated, and the coverage of relevant information varies in different oncology registries. 1. How can generation of RWD be improved (coverage and relevant parameters)? 2. How can data become more accessible? 3. How can obtained data be implemented as a basis for improving patient care?


M
MylanWorkshop language: English

    N
    NeoproteomicsWorkshop language: English
    • 2171

      Can proteomic analysis be combined with non-invasive imaging to avoid unnecessary biopsies and what are the options for combination with genomic analysis to improve diagnosis and prognosis?


      na


    O
    olink bioscienceWorkshop language: English
    • 2135

      1. What are the reasons that protein interactions are not currently used for diagnostic purposes? Are there knowledge or technological gaps that need to be addressed?


      Olink Bioscience is developing several new technologies for in-situ imaging of cells and tissues. The methods can be used for the for detection of single proteins, however with the right set up the method works equally well for protein interactions and post-translational modifications. If there is an interest from the community we could priortize work on developing brightfield and fluroescent detection of protein interactions for desired targets.

    • 2136

      2. What are the main targets of interest in oncology for diagnostic/prognostic/screening with in situ analysis and are there opportunities for collaboration to explore these?


      Olink Bioscience is beginning commercialization of two in-situ staining assays. One assay produces an IHC-like signal, operates at room temperature, uses no enzymes and is automation compatible. The other assay is highly sensitive, can detect both proteins and nucleic acids in the same sample at the same time, and can be multiplexed. Which format to pursue first is highly dependent on the needs of the science community, and we very open for discussons and collaborations that are mutually beneficial.

    • 2137

      What are the opportunities and limitations for in situ assays in oncology today and how can existing methodologies be improved?


      - What is a single most important benefit of using in situ protein detection? - What an ideal in situ detection method means for you? - Are you satisfied with your antibodies’ performance? If you could change something about it, what would you change? - What is the hardest part about immunofluorescence/IHC protein detection? - How well does antibody optimization solve your problem? - If you had to choose between automation and sensitivity for an in situ analysis tool, which would you choose and why?


    Olink ProteomicsWorkshop language: English
    • 2172

      Precision medicine in cancer beyond genetic sequencing: which fluid biomarkers, in your area, will be needed for diagnosis, monitoring/progression and treatment outcome?


      From protein biomarker discovery to precision medicine Precision medicine is defined by the NIH as “an emerging approach for disease treatment and prevention that takes into account individual variability in genes, environment, and lifestyle for each person”. Healthcare today, however, still largely adheres to a one-size-fits-all approach, based on strategies that have been developed for the “average” person, with less consideration of individual differences. That inevitably leads to the questions of why these concepts have yet to be established in clinical practice and what is needed for it to happen? The move to more stratified medicine that delivers the right treatment to the right patient at the right time represents the next great movement for global healthcare, but also a colossal challenge for science. Protein biomarker strategies will be key to these developments, helping to us to better understand the biology of disease, to develop new, better and more targeted drugs, and to provide them to the right patients in a more stratified and effective manner. Olink’s vision is to help to drive the implementation of this vitally needed paradigm-shift in global healthcare by providing innovative and effective tools for protein biomarker discovery and development. Today, Olink’s protein biomarker panels enable rapid, robust identification of protein signatures to: • stratify patients • predict disease and treatment outcomes • understand pathophysiology or discover new drug targets We call this “Precision Proteomics”. We are continuously developing our platform, offering a wider selection of biomarker assays to enable our customers to cast the net as wide as possible for the discovery of new protein signatures. Using protein signatures will likely transform the future of disease diagnosis, treatment, and our understanding of health. We will provide these powerful tools to translate protein biomarker discovery into the clinic. To tailor healthcare to individual patients, Olink aims to be your partner every step of the way on this journey, from precision proteomics to precision diagnostics and the realization of precision medicine.


    R
    RaySearch LaboratoriesWorkshop language: English
    • 2144

      During cancer treatment, what are the biggest identified risks in the chemotherapy and surgery workflows, respectively? Which new treatment planning and management tools would help you reduce these risks?


      RaySearch Laboratories is a medical technology company that develops software for improved cancer treatment. One of the company’s goals is to reduce the time it takes for new research findings to become available clinically. The company’s first main product was RayStation, a treatment planning system for radiation therapy. The new product RayCare is an oncology information system, which supports comprehensive cancer care with combined workflows to coordinate radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and surgery. The increasing scope of our products make us interested in the expertise from all areas of cancer care.

    • 2146

      What are the main reasons for differences in treatment outcome between countries in Europe? How can these differences be minimized and best practice shared?


      RaySearch Laboratories is a medical technology company that develops software for improved cancer treatment. One of the company’s goals is to reduce the time it takes for new research findings to become available clinically. The company’s first main product was RayStation, a treatment planning system for radiation therapy. The new product RayCare is an oncology information system, which supports comprehensive cancer care with combined workflows to coordinate radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and surgery. The increasing scope of our products make us interested in the expertise from all areas of cancer care.


    redhot diagnostics ABWorkshop language: English
    • 2053

      What are the possibilities around using fucose/fucosylation as biomarker for cancer? How can this be further explored?


      We have a method on LCMS/MS for fucose, developed for other purposes. There are some articles that indicate that fucose may be a biomarker for cancer. We are interested to exploit that possibility and the potential use for this method in oncology.